Here we are looking at the role that women played during WWI, but are you sure you know how the war actually started?

If not, read more here!
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Over the course of the war…

Women

1600000

Took on traditionally male jobs during WWI

Women

950000

Worked in dangerous munitions factories, producing 80% of the UK’s armaments

Women

100000

Worked in transport - a staggering 555% increase on pre-war numbers

Women

3200000

In employment by July 1914 - a figure which quickly rose to 5 million

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1914
7th July 1914

RED CROSS FIELD DAY IN KENT COUNTRYSIDE
Red Cross Voluntary Aid Detachments from Brenchley, Matfield, Pembury and Speldhurst demonstrate the treatment of war casualties at a mock clearing hospital. Casualties are transported to a temporary base hospital.
The exercise is efficiently organised and executed, receiving high praise from War Office inspectors.
3rd August 1914

Germany declares war on France
4th August 1914

GOVERNMENT TAKES CONTROL OF ALL RAILWAYS
The Government takes control of all railways, including the South-Eastern and Chatham Railways.
8th August 1914

DEFENCE OF THE REALM ACT (DORA) INTRODUCED
Large areas of Kent become Restricted Areas, with only those holding an official pass allowed entry.
This gave the government more power than it would usually have. It allowed the government to quickly decide that something new could become a crime. For example, feeding wild animals became a crime because it was seen as a waste of food, which was hard to get during wartime. DORA also stopped newspapers from writing about anything that didn't support the war effort and which may have upset people who were fighting and working hard for their country. The government brought in Daylight Saving Time, where the clocks go forward one hour, so that daylight lasted longer and people could do more work.
  • Restrictions on keeping pigeons
  • Restrictions on public houses (pubs) so workers didn't get drunk
  • No lighting of bonfires or fireworks
  • A ban on buying binoculars
  • A charge for treason if anyone was caught discussing anything that might be useful to the enemy
  • The death penalty for breaking any of these laws
  • The death penalty for spies caught in Britain - German spies were shot in the Tower of London
11th August 1914

GERMANS DETAINED IN FOLKESTONE
About 200 German men are detained when they attempt to leave Folkestone and return home to Germany.
Under the Aliens Restriction Act, passed by the Government on August 5th, the deadline for "alien enemies" to leave the United Kingdom without a special permit was 10th August.
24th August 1914

COMMITTEE FOR REFUGEES SET UP IN FOLKESTONE
The Belgian Committee for Refugees is officially instituted at the French Protestant Church in Victoria Grove, Folkestone.
The Committee soon subdivides in order to support both the immediate needs of the refugees for food and clothing and their longer term needs for accommodation and employment.
By the end of August, 6,000 meals are being provided every day in Folkestone.
From early September, additional help with feeding and clothing refugees is provided by the London War Refugees Committee.
Local funds are boosted by additional contributions after appeals in national newspapers.
For more information see the "Report on the work of the Committee" by J A Ferguson, April 1916.
7th September 1914

FRANCO-BELGIAN NEWSPAPER ON SALE IN FOLKESTONE
The first copy of the "Franco-Belge de Folkestone", a daily newspaper for Folkestone's Belgian refugee community, goes on sale.
The newspaper is printed in French and published by F J Parsons Ltd at the Herald offices in Folkestone.
The price of a copy is five centimes or one halfpenny.
13th October 1914

KENT VOLUNTARY AID DETACHMENTS MOBILISE
The Kent Voluntary Aid Detachment receives a telegram with instructions to mobilise all hospitals at once and to prepare to receive large numbers of wounded.
In August 1914 there were about 50 Voluntary Aid Detachments in Kent.
In October over 80 Kent Voluntary Aid Detachment hospitals are quickly mobilised to receive Belgian casualties evacuated from Ostend.
Over the next 4 years, the Kent Voluntary Aid Detachment cares for over 126,000 sick and wounded soldiers, with many of the hospitals remaining open until 1919.
29th October

COUNTY PREPARES EMERGENCY MEASURES
A Central Organising Committee is set up at a meeting at Sessions House, County Hall, Maidstone, to co-ordinate Local Emergency Committees with a mandate to organise the movement or destruction of livestock, transport, stores, crops and the movement of civilians in the event of an invasion.
On 16th October 1914, the Home Office issues a confidential memorandum: "Instructions for the Guidance of the Civil Population in the event of belligerent operations in the United Kingdom" to Lord Lieutenants of a number of counties, including Kent.
Representatives from around the county attend a meeting on 29th October at County Hall, Maidstone, chaired by Lord Harris, Vice-Lord Lieutenant of Kent.
For further information see the correspondence concerning the setting up of the Central Organising Committee and Local Emergency Committees.
23rd July 1914

Austria- Hungary sends ultimatum to Serbia.
28th July 1914

Austria declares war on Serbia
4th August 1914

WAR DECLARED BY GOVERNMENT
Sir Edward Grey's speech is communicated to people by special telegrams displayed on windows of the Kentish Gazette. There is widespread cheering across the county
8th August 1914

KENT VOLUNTARY AID DETACHMENT FORMED
All Kent branches of the St John Ambulance Society, the British Red Cross and the Territorial Force Voluntary Aid are amalgamated to work together as the Kent Voluntary Aid Detachment
8TH August 1914

DOVER IS DECLARED A RESTRICTED AREA
Notices are issued warning the public that entrance into Dover will only be allowed under strict restrictions. All people are liable to search.
8TH August 1914

ASHFORD RAILWAY WORKERS CALLED UP
800 Territorials and Reservists have now been called up from the Ashford Railway Works
15th August 1914

PIGEONS OFFERED FOR WAR SERVICE
Members of the Folkestone and District Homing Pigeons Society have offered their birds to the Government for conveying messages.
20th August 1914

LARGE NUMBERS OF BELGIAN REFUGEES NOW ARRIVING IN FOLKESTONE
Increasingly large numbers of Belgian refugees are now arriving in Folkestone in fishing boats and coal carriers.
27th August 1914

WOUNDED BRITISH SOLDIERS ARRIVE IN FOLKESTONE
The first wounded British troops are brought to Folkestone on the afternoon ferry from Boulogne.
30th August 1914

Lady Dorothie Fielding joined the Munro British Red Cross Motor Ambulance Corps and in September went to the Front.
11th September 1914

HOP-PICKERS' HQ IN CAPEL TO BE A RECRUITING STATION
Father Wilson is making arrangements for the Rose and Crown in Capel, his headquarters for workers during the hop-picking season, to be used as a Recruiting Station.
Ten Territorials recently visited the hop-fields at the invitation of Father Wilson and a number of hop-pickers have indicated that they will be ready to join the Forces as soon as their work in the hop gardens is over.
14th October 1914

REFUGEES TRANSPORTED FROM OSTEND TO FOLKESTONE
South Eastern & Chatham Railways ships "Invicta", "Victoria" and "Queen" rescue thousands of refugees who have fled from Ostend.
The refugees are taken on board and brought into Folkestone.

Vera Brittain and thirty six other new students (freshers) commence at Somerville College, Oxford University
24th December

1ST BOMB TO FALL ON BRITISH SOIL LANDS IN DOVER
The bomb, dropped from a German aircraft, lands in a cabbage patch in a garden next to the Rectory of St James' Church.
The gardener, James Banks, is knocked out of a tree and bruised. The bomb leaves a crater 5ft deep and smashes windows in the Rectory.
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1915
2nd January

1ST AMBULANCE TRAINS RUN FROM DOVER HARBOUR
The new Marine Station on Dover Pier opens as a Military Hospital Base. Army Ambulance Trains are dispatched from the Marine Station.
5th March

EGGS FOR THE WOUNDED NEEDED
Local papers publish appeals for donations of eggs for wounded soldiers in hospitals.
4th August

FISHING INDUSTRY SUFFERING BADLY
The Local Fisheries Committee reports to Kent County Council that the fishing industry in Kent has been considerably hampered as a consequence of the war. In places it is practically at a standstill.
2nd September

KING GEORGE V VISITS SHORNCLIFFE BARRACKS
King George V arrives by Royal Train at Lyminge. Accompanied by Lord Kitchener, the King inspects the Canadian troops at Shorncliffe.
12th October

On the morning of October 12, 1915, the 49-year-old British nurse Edith Cavell is executed by a German firing squad in Brussels, Belgium.
17th November

HMHS ANGLIA STRIKES MINE AND SINKS
The Hospital Ship "Anglia" is 3 miles off Dover when she strikes a mine and is sunk. The "Anglia" is the first Hospital Ship to be sunk whilst carrying wounded during the war.
The collier SS "Lusitania", one of the vessels assisting in the rescue of those aboard the "Anglia", also strikes a mine and is wrecked by an explosion.
HMHS "Anglia" had left Boulogne at 11am in the morning with over 360 wounded servicemen on board, together with doctors, nurses and stretcher bearers as well as the ship's crew.
Initially it is estimated that around 85 lives are lost in the disaster. This figure is later estimated to be in the region of 150.
Survivors are brought into Dover in a number of vessels.
1st February

CANADIANS ARRIVING IN FORCE IN FOLKESTONE
Tents and huts are being set up in and around Shorncliffe Army Camp, on the outskirts of Folkestone, to accommodate the large numbers of Canadian troops to be based in the area.
During 1915, around 40,000 Canadians arrive in Folkestone.
7th April

BUFFET FOR SOLDIERS AT FOLKESTONE HARBOUR
The buffet for soldiers, sailors and Red Cross workers returning from the front is re-established at Folkestone Harbour Station.

A buffet, run by local ladies, was first set up in October 1914 to serve refreshments to soldiers, sailors and Red Cross workers returning home on leave.
"The Times", 08/04/1915, reports that the buffet was the pioneer soldiers' buffet in the country and was only discontinued a few weeks ago, when leave was practically stopped. It has now been re-established after an appeal in the newspaper.
The local ladies who have been persuaded to return to running the buffet are Mrs Napier Sturt, Miss Margaret Ann Jeffrey and Miss Florence Augusta Jeffrey.
The buffet will be open every day from noon until after the boats have finished unloading in the evening.
A visitors' book is provided in the buffet and visitors are asked to sign their names inside this book, together with the date of their visit and the branch of the forces in which they are serving.
18th September

Vera Brittain enlists as a VAD (Voluntary Aid Detachment).
14th October

SAFEGUARDING PIGEONS ON DUTY
In Dover the public are warned not to shoot homing pigeons "on passage."
Notices issued by Dover Patrol and Dover Garrison warn that "anyone who shoots or kills a Carrier or Homing Pigeon whilst on passage renders himself liable to prosecution."
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1916
2nd March

A system of compulsory recruitment for the armed forces was introduced and called conscription. This in turn made the need for female labour even more vital and the government began co-ordinating the employment of women to fill the gaps.
2nd April

EXPLOSION AT FAVERSHAM GUNPOWDER WORKS

By 1916, the labour force at the Faversham "Cotton Powder" factory is working flat-out to supply munitions for the Army. At least 116 people are killed in the explosion, including the whole of the Works Fire Brigade.
Afterwards, at the Coroner's inquest, the jury records a verdict of "accidental death caused by shock and injuries received in an explosion due to an accidental fire, cause unknown".
20th April

Florence Cordell became the first woman bus conductor in Britain.
26th October

SOUTH EASTERN & CHATHAM RAILWAY COMPANY STEAMER QUEEN BLOWN UP IN CHANNEL
The turbine steamer "Queen" is caught in mid-channel by a German raiding flotilla.
TSS “Queen” had been used for carrying troops to Boulogne during the day. She is returning to Folkestone at night carrying mail when she is surrounded by German ships and ordered to stop. German officers and men board the "Queen" and order Captain Carey and his crew to lower their boats and leave the ship.
The crew launch the lifeboats. Shortly afterwards, the Germans fire a torpedo into the hull of the "Queen".The explosion is heard in Folkestone.The "Queen" drifts for three hours before she eventually sinks off South Goodwin.
One crew member, 20-year-old Lewis Dilnot, from Folkestone, serving as a cook on board the "Queen", is lost.
The rest of the crew row ashore to the Warren safely.
19th March

BOMBS DROPPED ON DOVER, DEAL, RAMSGATE AND MARGATE

4 German seaplanes drop bombs over Dover, Deal, Ramsgate and Margate.
The initial casualty figures show that 9 people have been killed, including 5 children on their way to St Luke's Sunday School in Ramsgate.
A further 31 people have been injured. A number of buildings have been badly damaged.
Chatham House in Ramsgate, currently being used as a hospital for Canadian soldiers, has been damaged during the raid.
The following night there is a meeting of townspeople at Ramsgate Town Hall to insist on better protection for the town against attack by aircraft. Local people are angry because the warning siren did not sound until the danger was practically over.
The next day, a train load of motor wagons with anti-aircraft guns, search lights, motor cycles and about 60 soldiers arrive at Ramsgate. 2 search lights and guns are placed on Warre's field near Ramsgate Station, and on Government Acre on the Westcliff. The West Cliff promenade is closed to the public.
4th July

1ST OF THE WOUNDED FROM THE BATTLE OF THE SOMME ARRIVE IN KENT

For the next fortnight, convoys of wounded men are carried across Kent by road and rail to hospitals with beds available.
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1917
18th January

PIG, POULTRY AND RABBIT REARING IN DOVER
Dover Town Council encourages local residents to keep pigs, poultry and rabbits in an effort to increase the supply of food.
Notices inform the public that "There are probably many places in the Borough where pigs can be kept without risk of nuisance. Apart from individual pig-keepers, groups of people might combine to keep a number of pigs jointly and would be able to collect sorted waste from shops, hotels, boarding houses, and private houses."
Free leaflets on the keeping of pigs, poultry and rabbits are available from the Sanitary Inspector.
4th April

BELGIAN KITCHEN GARDENS IN FOLKESTONE
The Folkestone Refugees Committee reports that the Belgian Kitchen Garden scheme is proving successful.
Belgian refugees are cultivating around 4 acres of land on the West Cliff estate in Folkestone.
25th May

FOLKESTONE DEVASTATED BY GOTHA BOMBING RAID

Diverted Gotha planes drop bombs on Folkestone. Over 70 civilians and 18 military personnel are killed; many more are injured.
Bombs in Tontine Street, crowded with shoppers, account for the deaths of 61 people, mainly women and children.
At the Shorncliffe Army Camp, 18 military personnel are killed. 17 of these men are Canadian servicemen.
There is extensive damage to numerous buildings in and around Folkestone.
29th May

PUBLIC ASKED TO EAT LESS BREAD
The Ministry of Food appeals to the public to eat less food.
The public are told: "We must all eat less food; especially we must all eat less bread and none must be wasted."
For further information see the letter from Ministry of Food appealing for a reduction in the consumption of bread, 29th May 1917.
14th July

AIRCRAFT RETURN FROM FRANCE TO DEFEND KENT
Royal Flying Corps gunners and pilots are recalled from France to defend Kent.
56 Squadron is to be based at Bekesbourne Airfield, near Canterbury.
6th December

CANTERBURY RECTOR ARRESTS BOMBER CREW
Rev Philip Somerville, a Special Policeman, arrests the 3 crew members of a German Gotha plane which has landed in a field on the outskirts of Canterbury.
The plane has crash-landed in a field near Broad Oak Road, Canterbury.
After surrendering their arms and equipment to the Rev. Somerville, the men are taken by ambulance wagon to Canterbury Police Station. The two airmen who have been injured in the crash are then taken on to be treated in hospital.
27th February

WOMEN RALLY TOGETHER TO ORGANISE WORK ON THE LAND
Village Registrars have been appointed to co-ordinate women's agricultural work throughout the county.
On 27th February 1917, West Kent Village Registrars take part in a conference organised by the West Kent Women's Agricultural Committee, at Sessions House, County Hall, Maidstone.
Miss La Mothe, newly appointed “Woman Inspector” for the Board of Agriculture, introduces speakers at the well-attended conference.
17th April

CAMP FOR CHINESE WORKFORCE SET UP IN FOLKESTONE

The tented camp, to accommodate 2,000 Chinese workers, is designated as a Labour Concentration Camp.
In France, the British Army has a number of men working behind the lines, carrying out repair and maintenance work. With the war dragging on, the Army starts moving these men to the front lines to replace the growing numbers of casualties there.
In turn, these men need to be replaced and, early in 1917, Britain starts recruiting men from a number of other countries, including China.
To accommodate the Chinese Labour Force before they are sent out to France, a camp is set up near Cherry Garden Lane in Folkestone. This has the capacity for around 2,000 men at any one time.
While they wait to be sent out to France, many of the Chinese workers are employed in manual work in military hospitals in the area and a number are sent work at Shorncliffe Military Camp. Altogether, a total of around 94,000 Chinese pass through Folkestone on their way to France.
13th June

CANADIAN FLOWER DAY AT SHORNCLIFFE CEMETERY
1,000 children from at least 20 schools in Folkestone, Hythe and the surrounding area come to Shorncliffe Military Cemetery to lay posies of flowers on the graves of Canadian soldiers.
As the children make their tribute to the Canadian soldiers, including the 17 who were killed in the Gotha raid just a few days ago, the band of the Canadian Artillery plays “The Maple Leaf”.
Two Canadian officers, the Folkestone Mayor, Stephen Penfold and the Vicar of Hythe, Reverend H Dale, give brief speeches.
15th September

KENT PRISONER OF WAR FUND

The Kent Prisoner of War Fund is now regularly forwarding parcels of food to over 1,200 men who are Prisoners of War in Germany and Turkey.
With the exception of a few civilians from Kent at Ruhleben, all the men being supported by the Kent Prisoner of War Fund belong to the Royal West Kent and East Kent (Buffs) Regiments.
Over the past 2½ years, branch committees throughout the county have been providing support especially for the men from their own localities, under the general direction of the Kent Committee. This valuable work by local committees continues to provide for about half the total number of parcels sent.
Under the current scheme, 6 parcels of food, each containing about 10lbs of food, are sent to every Prisoner of War each month.
The total cost of sending these food parcels is estimated to be £3,500 each month.
A number of Kent schools have adopted a prisoner. In addition to providing the money for his parcel, they are maintaining a direct communication with him.
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1918
15th February

HEAVY SHELLING IN DOVER HARBOUR

The trawler "James Pond" and a number of drifters are sunk. The paddle minesweeper "Newbury" and a number of other drifters are badly damaged and towed into Dover by tugs.
89 lives are lost.
39 bodies are recovered from the sea and taken to lie in Dover Market Hall before burial.
3rd March

PRISONERS OF WAR EMPLOYED ON FARMS
30 Prisoners of War are sent to The White House, Bough Beech, near Edenbridge to work on the land.
In 1916, the Government made arrangements for Prisoners of War to work on the land in the UK, but virtually the whole of Kent was considered a prohibited area for aliens and the county was excluded from this provision.
With increasing food shortages, coupled with a shortage of labour, there is a growing need for extra farm workers throughout the county.
On the 22nd January 1918, the Kent War Agricultural Committee was informed that the War Cabinet has sanctioned the employment of Prisoners of War for agricultural work.
These prisoners will now be allowed to be employed at farms in Kent (excluding districts within 5 miles of the coast, Romney Marsh and a portion of the Chatham area).
The prisoners are to be selected men, used to agricultural work in their native country, and will be employed in groups of 30 to 40 prisoners. They will be housed under guard at night in suitable depots selected by the County Committee. During the day the prisoners will be sent under escort to the farmers who have applied for them, within a marching radius of three to four miles of the depot, or to the nearest station when railway transport can be economically used. The farmer is required to pay the Commandant of the Camp for the services of the men weekly at the rate of 5½d. per hour worked. (This rate is raised in August to 6½d. per hour.)
The first group of 30 alien Prisoners of War arrives at The White House, Bough Beech, on 3rd March 1918 and another 15 join them at the end of April.
During the year, further groups of prisoners are sent to depots in other parts of Kent, including Dartford, Tenterden, West Kingsdown, Womenswold and Tovil, Maidstone.
By early July, the "Kent Messenger" reports that about 200 German Prisoners of War are now working on farms in Kent.
Demand for men is greater than the supply and the County War Agricultural Committee is endeavouring to arrange for more centres to be opened.
13th June

WOMEN'S LAND ARMY MARCHES THROUGH MAIDSTONE

The Maidstone branch of the Kent Women's Agricultural Committee organises a demonstration and recruiting meeting to attract more women and girls to work on the land.
Over 200 women and girls working on farms around Maidstone, accompanied by the Band of the 2nd Battalion of the Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment, Boy Scouts and Girl Guides, take part in a procession through the streets of Maidstone.
The procession presents an imposing spectacle, with the women carrying flags and banners as they march alongside farm wagons drawn by brightly decorated horses.
After marching through the town, the women assemble in front of a large crowd in the Lock Meadows. The Mayor, Councillor G Foster Clark, then presides over the recruiting meeting.
It is reported in the "Kent Messenger" that the number taking part in the procession could easily have been higher, but the organisers were anxious not to disrupt work in progress on the land.
17th September

BURNING SHIP TORPEDOED TO SAVE DOVER
HMS "Glatton", a newly commissioned coastal defence ship moored off Dover, catches fire. Vice-Admiral Sir Roger Keyes gives his order for the ship to be torpedoed in order to prevent an explosion which could devastate Dover.
11th November

NEWS OF THE ARMISTICE IS SPREAD THROUGHOUT THE COUNTY

News of the Armistice reaches people anxiously waiting outside newspaper offices and town halls around the county.

The Armistice between the Allies and Germany is signed in Compiègne in the early hours of 11th November 1918.
A cease-fire is to be in force at 11 am.
At 8 am, a nurse at St Anselm's VAD Hospital in Walmer receives a phone call from Deal Pier with the news; this news spreads quickly amongst staff and patients at the hospital.
At 9.10 am, in Sheerness, ships' sirens are heard hooting; troops marching through the streets cheer; people decorate the town with flags and bunting.
At 10.30 am, in Sittingbourne, the town's siren gives the "All Clear" signal; factory hooters are sounded, maroons are sent up at the Fire Station; peals of bells are rung from the Parish Church.
In Dover, a chorus of hooters from the ships of the Dover Patrol echoes everywhere; aeroplanes circle overhead.
By noon, Rochester Cathedral is crowded with people who have assembled for a thanksgiving service.
In Tunbridge Wells, the streets are thronged with people; impromptu processions spring up everywhere; in the evening all the lights in the town are switched on.
As we began to enter Folkestone Harbour about mid-day, every craft in there possessing a siren began to let it off. We were at first astounded by the noise – what was all the fuss about? But as it went on and on and we steamed slowly and majestically to our appointed birth, and beheld the crews of several ships cheering and waving at us, we tumbled to it. “Dickie,” said Captain Brown, “The bloody war’s over! It’s over!” And it was. No more slaughter, no more maiming, no more mud and blood, no more killing and disembowelling of horses and mules. No more of those hopeless dawns, with the rain chilling the spirits, no more crouching in inadequate dugouts scooped out of trench walls, no more dodging snipers’ bullets, no more of that terrible shell fire. No more shovelling up of bits of men’s bodies and dumping them into sandbags.
Lieutenant Richard Dixon Royal Field Artillery (Aurstralian War Memorial)
25th February

RATIONING OF MEAT, BUTTER AND MARGARINE
As from 25th February 1918, shops selling butcher’s meat, butter or margarine in Kent can serve only their registered customers.
Ration Cards have been made available to the public by local Food Offices.
Any person who wishes to buy butcher's meat, butter or margarine from a retailer must be registered with the retailer from whom they wish to purchase.
25th March

WALTER TULL KILLED IN ACTION IN FRANCE
Born in Folkestone, Lieutenant Walter Tull was one of the first black officers to serve in the British Army. He was also a professional footballer for Tottenham Hotspur and Northampton Town. He is killed in action near Favreuil, in the Pas de Calais.
Walter Tull was born in Allendale Street, Folkestone in 1888.
24th April

BATTLE WEARY HMS VINDICTIVE RETURNS TO DOVER

The HMS "Vindictive" is brought back to Dover after suffering heavy losses in the Zeebrugge raid. The bodies of the 151 men who perished during the raid are taken to the Market Hall in Dover.
30th April

US TROOPS MARCH THROUGH DOVER

For the next month, people in Dover witness the sight of vast numbers of American troops marching from the railway station to Dover Harbour.
The troops are on their way to join the Allied Forces on the Western Front.
19th - 20th May

BOMBING ONSLAUGHT CAUSES DESTRUCTION OVER LARGE AREA OF KENT
A fleet of 33 German aircraft flies over Kent for a final bombing onslaught on London.
Bombs are dropped over Dover, Langdon, Guston, St Margaret's-at-Cliffe, Faversham, Detling Aerodrome, Margate, Northdown, St Nicholas-at-Wade and Acol.
In Faversham, a bomb blinds one man.
In Dover there is extensive damage to a number of buildings and in Margate windows are broken at St Mary's Church.
One Gotha plane crashes at Harty, on the Isle of Sheppey, one plane crashes in open countryside between Harrietsham and Frinsted and one plane is brought down in the sea off Dover.
1st July

MILLIONTH WOUNDED MAN BROUGHT TO DOVER
Over a million wounded men have now landed in Dover.
For nearly 4 years, wounded casualties have been transported in hospital ships, escorted by the Dover Patrol, and taken on from Dover to hospitals, many of them in Kent.
7th September

BLACKBERRIES FOR THE TROOPS
School children have been given permission to collect blackberries 3 half-days each week to contribute to the National Blackberry Collection.
In response to a Government appeal, arrangements have been made with school authorities and village registrars to organise the work of gathering the fruit, which will be used to make jam for the troops.
Local Food Control Committees have appointed agents to receive the blackberries collected.
17th November

PRISONERS OF WAR ARRIVE IN DOVER

The first group of 800 released British Prisoners of War arrives in Dover.
A large and enthusiastic crowd of soldiers and local people has assembled on the Admiralty Pier and in nearby streets to welcome the men.
The Prince of Wales has travelled down to Dover to read a message of welcome from the Queen.
Sirens are sounded as the boat carrying the released Prisoners of War comes through the entrance of Dover Harbour.
As the men come ashore, they are greeted with the refrain of "Pack up your troubles in your old kit bag, and smile, smile, smile" played by one of the regimental bands.
They then proceed to the area in front of the Customs House, where the Prince of Wales reads the Queen's message.
Arrangements have been made for the repatriation of the men. Accommodation for 10,000 men has been prepared at a rest camp and barrack in Dover. Ambulances and charabancs are ready to transport those men unable to march.
In the evening, a "welcome home" concert party is put on at the camp for the men.
26th November

350 MEN DEMOBILISED TO AID FOOD PRODUCTION

The Government is granting permission for a number of men to be released from His Majesty's Forces to assist with the production of food. The quota for Kent is 350 men.
For further information see the "Report of the work done by the Kent Agricultural Committee (Food Production Department, Board of Agriculture and Fisheries) from its formation until December 31st, 1918".